May 042013
 

“I think ideas are one of the things I do well,” says Susan Anderson-Newham, 2013 Mover & Shaker, block-play advocate, actor, writer, storyteller and, most importantly, the Pierce County Library System’s (WA) early learning supervising librarian. In this interview, Anderson-Newman talks about the importance of collaboration and a good sense of humor, why hands-on play is key to kids’ learning, her inspirations and passions, and her top picture books of all time.

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Mar 222013
 

If the act of rereading a book is partly about remembering the you who paged through it the first time, and comparing that version of yourself to the one dipping into that book again, the classics that we read in high school offer endless possibilities for rediscovery, for looking at ourselves then and now. That’s part of what makes Kevin Smokler’s new book, Practical Classics: 50 Reasons to Reread 50 Books You Haven’t Touched Since High School, so much fun. His homages to 50 titles, including Pride and Prejudice, The Great Gatsby, The Bluest Eye, The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter, and even The Scarlet Letter (he writes, “I don’t like it either,” but argues for rereading it nonetheless), offers a truly enjoyable trip down one’s personal memory lane of books. It’s also a love letter to the act of reading, to continual learning, and to making an effort to slow down and savor the good books in life.

=> http://bit.ly/YmelCy

Mar 162013
 

Pushy parents who spend a small fortune lavishing books on their young children in the hope of giving them a head start before primary school may be wasting their time and money, according to experts.

In reality, as every child knows, the business of helping pre-school children learn their first words is surprisingly simple – repetition and familiarity. A favourite book read over and over again trumps the mini-library of children’s books found in some British households. As the saying goes, less is more. => http://ind.pn/ZCbyYh

Mar 102013
 

Lemony Snicket is the pen name of American novelist Daniel Handler. Snicket is the author of several children’s books, serving as the narrator of A Series of Unfortunate Events (his best-known work) and appearing as a character within the series.

Even reluctant readers find all of the books fun to read. They are told with such an offbeat sense of humour. The stories are mysterious, but they are soothing in that the plot is predictable, the writing is informal and the characters are very simple. Lemony Snicket has very cleverly titled his books using alliteration: There is a wonderful use of language, and the books are a pleasure to read aloud.

Incorporate the books into your classroom curriculum with these discussion questions, vocabulary activities, writing activities, character studies, and cross-curricular activities to supplement and enhance your teaching.  => http://bit.ly/14iVsUE