Posts

News: Teaching Google, Getting girls to code, Communication app for special education, Tech in blended learning

Teach your students the right way to Google
In the age of the split-second Google search, it’s more critical than ever to train students to distinguish between primary and secondary sources.

How to get more girls to code: Use Frozen’s Elsa
If you want to lure young girls into computer coding, go straight to the heart — which these days is likely to inhabit the magical snowy landscape of Frozen. Code.org announced Wednesday that it had teamed up with Disney Interactive on a tutorial that lets young programmers help Frozen sisters Anna and Elsa make ice fractals and skating patterns using basic coding skills.

Special education communication apps
These apps are intended to help special-needs students build communication skills

Blended Learning: It’s Not the Tech, It’s How the Tech is Used
Since the 1970s we’ve known of Moore’s Law, which states the processing power of computers will double every two years. Forty years later, computers are presumably a million times more powerful. The education world is finally beginning to harness this power, taking us far beyond the origins of computer labs where students clicked away at the Oregon Trail and practiced word processing. Finally, we’re starting to reach a point where adaptive online programs engage students with rigorous academic content at their exact level while providing teachers with detailed data, allowing us to better group students and meet their unique needs.

pbs_mathPBS launches math series for kids in ‘Odd Squad’
Consider this math problem: PBS leaves the train station headed west under a full head of steam to find a new series to teach math to youngsters. Tim McKeon and Adam Peltzman leave a train station at top speed headed east with an idea for a show…

Introduce Students to Open-Source Software Development

Google’s new Code-In competition, which gets under way November 22, presents 13- to 18-year-olds with eight tasks, ranging from refactoring code and interface design to such not-so-techie jobs as writing and editing software documentation and developing marketing materials. For every three tasks they complete, students earn $100, up to a maximum of $500. Ten grand-prize winners will get an all-expenses-paid trip with a family member to Google’s Mountain View, California headquarters. The trip includes a tour of the Googleplex facility and meetings with some of the company’s engineers.

Deadline: Contest ends January 10, 2011; winners announced February 14, 2011

Click Here for More Information and Contest Updates