Technology Is Changing The Way Children Learn To Read

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One of the reasons that it was so difficult to get children to learn to read in the past was because it was hard to develop functional lessons that were applicable to real-life situations. For example, reading a story about a duck was helpful, but it was not always something that kids could readily apply to what was going on around them. As the Internet and other technology continues to advance, it is becoming easier to teach children to read in ways that they will be able to use in their daily lives.

The progressive parents have stopped fighting with video games and have realized that video games can be a great way to help kids to learn to read at almost any level. Interactive video games that teach reading skills are available all over the Internet and can be used by children at every level of aptitude. If you want your kids to learn to read, then utilizing a video game can be the most effective way to do it.

The interactive video games that connect people all over the world can help children to learn to read in several different ways. Kids want to play those games. But if they want to play, then they will have to learn how to read. Their friends are already playing online interactive video games and no kid wants to be left behind when it comes to the popular games everyone is playing. The games also require people to chat back and forth using the written word. Not only can your kids learn to read by playing video games, but they can also learn sentence structure and good grammar as well.

Another way that technology is helping kids to learn to read is by offering new reading courses for kids at all levels that can be easily manipulated to help the child learn at his pace. In a classroom setting, there can be pressure that may leave behind some of the kids that cannot keep up the same pace as everyone else. But when the child gets home, he can stop a DVD reading lesson and review it at his own pace. Now every kid has the chance to learn to read thanks to technology that was not available just 20 years ago.

Because there are so many technology tools to help children read, that allows the parents to find the time to get involved in their kids’ lessons as well. The portability of technology means that parents and kids can be in the same room reviewing a reading lesson for the day while the parent does his own work tasks on the Internet as well.

Technology continues to bring breakthroughs in ways that allow us to become more interactive with the world around us. By channeling reading into video games, interactive DVDs and other materials, educators can help kids start to read at ages that may have been impossible in the past. If the child wants to learn, then there is nothing to stop him.

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Author: Cookie Maxwell MyReviewsNow.net offers information regarding phonics activities. For more on teaching children to read, please shop online with us at MyReviewsNow.net.

10 Ways to Use Skype in the Classroom

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Skype is a free downloadable software that lets you do voice and video calls combined with instant messaging for free. The possibilities of Skype to flatten your classroom are endless.

Interview authors, astronauts and other amazing individuals from around the world.

Collaborate with classrooms, businesses and more in multi-disciplinary projects.

Explore a volcano, rainforest, or history museum in virtual fieldtrips with experts in the field or even share your field trip experiences with others.

Practice conversational foreign languages with native speakers.

Provide additional support for students needing extra attention or unable to come to class.

Invite a guest lecturer from leading educators and experts from anywhere in the world.

Explore foreign cultures first hand with classroom to classroom video conferencing.

Broadcast a performance or project to parents and families unable to make it to school.

Access and share professional development opportunities with educators on the go.

Collaborate with innovative educators to plan units, lessons, and more.

5 Skype Companion Tools

To get the most out of Skype, you should consider utilizing other web 3.0 and social networking sites such as

Web 2.0 Tools for Class Projects – such as Twiddla in order to brainstorm, collaborate, and share ideas in real time.

Google Docs – allows participants to share and edit documents.

Flickr – to share photos and enhance the feeling of learning together across a distance.

Blogs – to reflect and share learning.
 
Twitter – as a backchannel during interviews, lectures, etc and as a way to continue the conversation throughout the school year.

3 Ways to Connect with Others Using Skype

Online Skype Communities

ePals Global Community offers a free 30 day trial. Sign up to connect with other classrooms using Skype.
 
Skype in the Classroom Ning is for teaches interested in using Skype to connect with other teachers for idea sharing and classroom video conferencing.

The Mixxer is a free educational community for language exchanges via Skype.

Meet the Author Network connects you with numerous authors willing to enter your library or classroom for 10 – 15 minute skyp sessions for free. You can also set up longer interviews for a fee.

Global Skype Projects

Global School Network engages classrooms worldwide in meaningful project-based learning exchanges to develop science, math, and literacy skills and foster collaboration, global citizenship, and multicultural understandings.

Taking it Global is an online community of global educators with the goal of making a difference in the world.

Around the World with 80 Schools introduced on the Langwitches blog challenges teachers to connect with 80 different schools via skype in order to circle the globe once. 

Skype in Education Directories  

Connect with other educator’s looking for video conferencing classroom partnerships at these directories.
Did I miss one? Please add it in comments. Thanks!

Skype in Schools Directory

Eduskypers Phonebook

Ready to install and get started with Skype for free? View this Skype techtorial for teachers.

Free Educational Resources | Interactive Whiteboard Lessons by Learning Today  

Education of the future?

[From Fast Company]

On the face of it, Philadelphia’s High School of the Future, a
collaboration between Microsoft (NASDAQ:MSFT) and the city’s public-school district, seems like the kind of out-in-left-field experiment guaranteed to inspire dissent. Yet the school opened last September to almost universal acclaim. Breathless press reports read like an old Jetsons script: Interactive whiteboards! Combination-free lockers! A laptop for every student! An NPR feature titled “In Philly ‘Future’ School, Books Are So 20th Century” went all gooey over the school’s universal Wi-Fi and student-ID smartcards, glossing over just how these bells and whistles were supposed to revolutionize
education.

But the news reports captured only part of the project and, in many ways, the least-important part. The School of the Future is not just a high-tech overlay on the traditional curriculum–it represents a wholesale tearing apart of that traditional curriculum. The three Rs are gone; science, English, math, writing, and the rest are being taught not as separate”disciplines,” but as a set of interdependent tools for understanding real-world problems. And while the School of the Future may occupy a relatively radical position on the spectrum, corporate involvement in the education system is becoming commonplace, a role that has stirred plenty of controversy.

For example – this comment from Stephen Downes:

When schools come to depend on the infusion of talent and money from a corporation, what happens when the corporation pulls out (or threatens to pull out unless the learning takes on a pro-corporate spin)?

and this from Tim Stahmer

I’m somewhat ambivalent about allowing big business to direct the course of American education. It’s certainly good that elements of the larger community are interested in improving teaching and learning.

On the other hand, K-12 education should not be all about training “a future generation of Redmond cubicle warmers” or building “a nation of pitchmen”.