Virginia Hamilton Conference offers two outreach grants of $1,000 each

grants

Each year, two grants up to $1000 each are available for projects to develop new classroom or library programs that raise awareness of multicultural literature among young people particularly, but not exclusively, through the works of Virginia Hamilton.

Each year we will award one grant to a K-12 teacher, and one will be awarded to a school library or youth services librarian in a public library.

Eligible applicants must currently work with or plan to work with children or adolescents in any grade from preschool through high school or in a public or school library.

Applicants must submit an application form, a professional reference and a proposal detailing the development of a new classroom or library program that:

* Promotes awareness of multicultural themes and issues through outstanding literature

* Illustrates the use of exemplary multicultural literature, particularly but not exclusively the works of Virginia Hamilton

* Demonstrates effective organization, methods and/or library service

* Includes a plan for documenting the development of the program throughout the grant period

* Cover sheet with your name, postal and e-mail address, telephone number and project title

* Detailed description of the proposed program that includes:

o Setting (classroom and/or library)

o Population (grade level and/or age range)

o Program goals

o Dates of the program and a detailed timeline of events

o Program procedures, methods and organization

* Evidence that the program will promote awareness of multicultural themes and issues

* A program budget

* Evidence of the use of exemplary multicultural literature; particularly, but not exclusively, the works of Virginia Hamilton

* Plan for documenting the program’s development throughout the grant period

* Program evaluation procedure

Award application deadline is February 28.

Grant recipients will be announced at the annual Virginia Hamilton Conference on Multicultural Literature for Youth at Kent State University, scheduled for April 9 and 10, 2015. For further information about the conference, please visit www.kent.edu/virginiahamiltonconference.

The Virginia Hamilton and Arnold Adoff Creative Outreach Grant is sponsored by the College and Graduate School of Education, Health, and Human Services and the School of Library and Information Science in conjunction with the Kent State University Foundation and the Office of Continuing and Distance Education, with generous support from private donors and Scholastic Press.

The illiterate of the 21st Century

The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read and write, but those who cannot learn, unlearn, and relearn.

Alvin Toffler

Alvin Toffler

Storytime, Science, and Silliness: Up Close with Librarian Susan Anderson-Newham

“I think ideas are one of the things I do well,” says Susan Anderson-Newham, 2013 Mover & Shaker, block-play advocate, actor, writer, storyteller and, most importantly, the Pierce County Library System’s (WA) early learning supervising librarian. In this interview, Anderson-Newman talks about the importance of collaboration and a good sense of humor, why hands-on play is key to kids’ learning, her inspirations and passions, and her top picture books of all time.

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Again, again! That is the best way to learn to read

Pushy parents who spend a small fortune lavishing books on their young children in the hope of giving them a head start before primary school may be wasting their time and money, according to experts.

In reality, as every child knows, the business of helping pre-school children learn their first words is surprisingly simple – repetition and familiarity. A favourite book read over and over again trumps the mini-library of children’s books found in some British households. As the saying goes, less is more. => http://ind.pn/ZCbyYh

Exhausted from organising and directing students? The Daily Five

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Do you love teaching but feel exhausted from the energy you expend cajoling, disciplining, and directing students on a daily basis? If so, you’ll want this book …. http://bit.ly/Ne1fmI

Exhausted from organising and directing students? The Daily Five

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Gail Boushey

Do you love teaching but feel exhausted from the energy you expend cajoling, disciplining, and directing students on a daily basis? If so, you’ll want this book …. http://bit.ly/Ne1fmI

6 Practical Ways to Encourage Young Kids to Read More

Reading is a good habit. Young children should be encouraged to read more at early stage. Some parents find it hard to get their children to read because their children are attracted by the television programs and computers.

I am here to share with you some practical tips which you can apply so that you can get your young children to read more.

• First thing first, being parents, you are “responsible” to read with your children at least once every day. You should accompany them when they are reading. Don’t just give instructions to them. If your kids do not like a book you are reading together with them, you should put it aside. Don’t force your kids to accept the book.

• Besides accompanying them, you should be a reading role model to your kids. Let them see that you always read. It will be better if you can share some interesting things with them. Tell them what you have read from the books, magazines or newspapers.

• Young children enjoy reading books which come with colorful pictures and simple words. Hence, you are reminded to select the right reading materials for them. You should take note about your children’s interests. At the same time, you must make sure that you children have plenty to read at home. It is important for you to keep books and other reading materials in their reach.

• In order to encourage your kids to read, you must respect their choices. Do not set any limitation to them. Let them choose their own books based on their preferences. At the same time, you should take the opportunity to encourage your kids to try different kinds of books such as fiction, non-fiction, mysteries, biographies, etc. If possible, you should choose books that provide new experiences about different countries and cultures for them.

• You should find ways to motivate your children by praising them for their efforts. You are advised to listen to your children when they are reading. You can encourage them to read aloud. Then, you should start praising them for the newly acquired skills.

• Some young children refuse to read at the beginning stage. What you can do is to tell interesting stories to them. You are advised to look for creative ways to teach them good values so that you can help them to develop listening and thinking skills easily.

You love your children. You want them to have better future. Cultivating a lifetime reading habit will be the best gift you can provide for your beloved children.

 

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By Jeslyn Jessy  A blogger with wide interest in training and personal development. She strongly believes that competency skills are essential for a fast changing world. Besides, she also focuses on human health which is inter related to working performance. http://jessyanglo.blogspot.com/

Random House Awards for Teachers

Random House has announced the Random House Teacher Awards, which recognises “dynamic and resourceful teachers” who use their creativity to inspire and successfully instill a love of reading in their students”. Open to full and part-time teachers in public schools, the awards will be presented by Crown author Jonathan Kozol at the National Council of Teachers of English annual convention during the “Mentoring Matters” breakfast, held November 16 in Las Vegas.

Awards consist of a $10,000 first place grant, $5,000 second place grant and a $2,500 third place grant payable to each teacher’s school. Book donations will be made to winners and runners-up. More information, including application guidelines, can be found here. http://bit.ly/TlaPX8

Philly Event to Consider News Literacy

As Americans continue to lose faith in the fourth estate, Temple University’s Media Education Lab hopes to bring some thoughtful engagement to the topic—especially for those who work with our youngest citizens.For three days this week, Oct. 23–25, educators, journalists, researchers, and all those interested are invited to Philadelphia for “Rebooting the News: Reconsidering an Agenda for American Civic Education.” The goal? To finds ways to bring young people back into a civic mindset—helping them learn how to navigate the news in ways that make them feel more connected to their world. read more…

Scaffolding Literacy in the Middle Years

http://www.dest.gov.au/literacynumeracy/innovativeprojects/pdf/oakley_scaffolding.pdf

This report was written in conjunction with the Department of Education, Science and Technology and Deakin University with the aim of improving the literacy outcomes of educationally disadvantaged students in the middle years of schooling.