Teenagers wanted to participate in study of wellbeing

Twelve to 17-year-olds are needed to participate in a study which aims
to identify characteristics and strengths that are present in
adolescents with high wellbeing and mental health that can help other
adolescents.
YOUTH NEWS: http://www.youth.infoxchange.net.au

Study: Parents clueless about kids’ internet use

 

A recent survey by internet security firm Symantec Corp. suggests that many parents are unaware of their children’s internet activity and typically underestimate how often their kids encounter online threats. | Full Story

Creative Goal Setting for kids and teens

An Indian guide who displayed uncanny skills in navigating the rugged regions of the Southwest was asked how he did it. “What is your secret of being an expert tracker and trail-blazer?” a visitor asked him.

The guide answered: “There is no secret. One must only possess the far vision and the near look. The first step is to determine where you want to go. Then you must be sure that each step you take is a step in that direction.”

A dream is what you would like for life to be. A Goal is what you intend to make happen. A goal is the near look; what, specifically, you intend to do on a daily basis to get there.  >>> more

 

 

Scholastic Report: Kids Still Read for Fun—Teens, Less So


A new report released by Scholastic corroborates the findings of the company’s 2006 report on children’s reading habits, finding that pleasure reading in children begins to decline at age eight and continues to do so into the teen years. The study found that a majority of children (68%) think it is “extremely” or “very” important to read for pleasure, and “like” or “love” doing so. However, that number decreases with age: 82% percent of children ages five to eight “like” or “love” reading, compared to 55% for children ages 15 to 17. It also found that although children can readily envision a future in which reading and technology are increasingly intertwined, nearly two thirds prefer to read physical books, rather than on a computer screen or digital device. Additionally, a large majority of children recognize the importance of reading for their future goals, with 90% of respondents agreeing that they “need to be a strong reader to get into a good college.” 

The 2008 Kids and Family Reading Report, conducted by TSC, a division of consumer trends research company Yankelovich, is based on interviews with 1,002 respondents (501 children ages five to 17 and a parent or guardian for each). It explored kids’ attitudes toward reading, as well as the roles that technology, parental input and the Harry Potter books play in their reading habits.

Nearly one in four children was found to be a “high frequency” pleasure reader (reading daily), with an additional 53% qualifying as “moderate frequency” readers, reading for pleasure between one and six times per week. When children were asked why they do not engage in more pleasure reading, the top answer selected was “I would rather do other things,” followed in frequency by “I have too much schoolwork and homework,” and “I have trouble finding books that I like.” (This third answer was the top response selected in the 2006 survey.) Boys outnumbered girls by 10% in all age categories in stating that they had trouble finding enjoyable books.

Kids Jump on the Brand Wagon

70percent of parents say children influence their purchases Children in seven out of 10 city households have a say in which brand of product their parents purchase, according to a study by the Bureau of Market Research of the University…

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The Family Nutrition Book

Family Nutrition: Everything You Need to Know About Feeding Your Children – From Birth through Adolescence (Paperback)
by William Sears (Author)

From the reviews

Organic or regular baby food? White or wheat bread? Yogurt or ice cream? Parents often wonder how best to feed their families

 

the Searses offer the solid advice on breastfeeding, beginning solids, and feeding picky eaters you’d expect. But more than that, they provide a crash course in overall nutrition. You’ll learn how the body works, how to read food labels, what ingredients to look for (and which to avoid), how to trim fat from your diet, what makes up a balanced diet (not just the “food pyramid”), which foods are thought to prevent cancer, and more.

 

It is extremely informative and thorough, while managing to make nutrition very interesting. It is easy to read and understand.

 

The Searses also offer helpful food lists: good fats, best proteins, top 10 complex carbohydrates, and top 12 family foods, to name a few. A wealth of nutrition information is smoothly presented, complete with accessible scientific explanations, behavior modification tips and framed asides The book progresses from an overview of nutrients (water and fiber among them) to an extensive evaluation of food groups, including discussions of vegetarianism, organic foods and decoding packaging labels. Additional sections address weight control and the specific roles various foods play in disease prevention, stamina building, etc. Reference tables and an updated food pyramid will prove indispensable to the reader. You’ll even get favorite Sears family recipes to help you get started on the road to healthy eating. It’s all here, and it’s all mixed with a healthy dose of passion for eating well. So you can show your children–by example–how to stay healthy and feel great.

 

These cute posters make great decorations for children’s rooms

 Big Ears




Big Ears

Poster

Buy at AllPosters.com


Baby Orangutan




Baby Orangutan

Art Print

Bloom, Steve


Buy at AllPosters.com


Polar Bear Family




Polar Bear Family

Poster

Ward, Kennan


Buy at AllPosters.com


The First Kiss




The First Kiss

Poster

Buy at AllPosters.com

Emperor Penguins, Chick Being Brooded, Antarctica




Emperor Penguins, Chick Being Brooded, Antarctica

Photographic Print

Tipling, David


Buy at AllPosters.com

Facebook, states set online safeguards

Facebook, the world’s second-largest social-networking web site, will add more than 40 new safeguards to protect students and other users from sexual predators and cyber bullies, attorneys general from several states said May 8.
 
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