A Better Investment Than Pizza: Discussing Picture Books at Politics and Prose

In honor of the 75th anniversary of the Caldecott Award, Politics and Prose Bookstore in Washington, D.C., hosted a picture book panel on May 19 called Through the Ages for All Ages. Children’s book historian Leonard S. Marcus moderated the discussion, which drew a standing-room-only crowd; panel participants in the free-ranging and forthright conversation were publisher Neal Porter (r.); picture book authors Jon Scieszka (l.), Meg Medina, and Mac Barnett; and author-illustrators Laura Vaccaro Seeger (center) and Christopher Myers. http://bit.ly/19gn9CS

Feeding Your Picky Eater

Picky eater

I sometimes wonder how some children manage to get enough energy to keep them going and going and going. If your youngster is one of the many who pick and choose the foods they like most, he or she may often get on food jags, eating the same foods for all meals or even refusing food altogether. In my house this week, my 3-year-old is refusing to eat anything but peaches and bread! But I’m not too worried about this new phase; experts suggest it’s normal and may not last too long. In fact, in most cases like this, children are getting all the nutrients they need despite their limited intake.

As children grow, their needs start to change. The rapid growth they experienced in the first couple of years of life starts to slow and they require less food. Between birth and age 2, babies will as much as quadruple their weight, but then they will gain only a few pounds a year between the ages of 2 and 5.
Toddlers and preschoolers are asserting their new-found control when they play with toys instead of sitting at a table, or eat only the same foods meal after meal. It’s OK to allow your child to assert a certain level of independence.

Still, there are ways you can keep your child’s nutrition on track. Remember to avoid offering snacks too close to mealtimes. (There really was some merit in your mom’s telling you this would ruin your appetite!) And don’t allow your child to fill up on juice and milk at mealtime. One way to achieve this is to limit fluids offered at the table until after the meal has been eaten.

If you are concerned that your child’s menu is too limited, keep in mind that you are his or her role model. If you don’t eat green vegetables, it’s likely that your child won’t eat them either. Lately, I’ve found that my son has developed an interest in what the people around him are eating. During a recent trip to a restaurant he ate the entire serving of broccoli off my plate and has been obsessed with vegetables ever since!

Finally, if you want to introduce new foods to your child, be realistic. It takes many introductions of a new item until it is accepted and familiar. Start by offering only small samples, but make sure that you try repeatedly and don’t give up if it’s refused on your first try.

If you’re also dealing with a picky eater, it’s usually not worth all the battles to get your child to eat what you’ve planned for him or her — and you may find yourself making the same threats your parents made when you were young. I know that in my house we may be trading some vegetables for dessert in the near future.

Author: Cheryl Koch, M.S., R.D. Read the comments and discussion here

The illiterate of the 21st Century

The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read and write, but those who cannot learn, unlearn, and relearn.

Alvin Toffler

Alvin Toffler

A surprising lesson about listening to your inner gosling … “That is not a good idea”

That is not a good idea

That is not a good idea

Mo Willems

One day, a very hungry fox meets a very plump goose.
A dinner invitation is offered.
Will dinner go as planned? Or do the dinner plans involve a secret ingredient . . . ?
(Don’t forget to listen to the baby geese!)
From the brilliant mind of Mo Willems comes a surprising lesson about listening to your inner gosling.

=> http://bit.ly/10PBT3A (includes classroom activities and event kit)

A puzzle to solve – Toy Strip Origami

Three colored strips have to be folded into three colored letters. The key idea is to keep the number of the performed folds as low as possible. Is it a challenge that would be TOY to you?

Toy Strip Origami

http://bit.ly/121ecdq

To acquire the habit of reading is to …

To acquire the habit of reading is to construct for yourself a refuge from almost all of the miseries of life.

W. Somerset Maugham

Storytime, Science, and Silliness: Up Close with Librarian Susan Anderson-Newham

“I think ideas are one of the things I do well,” says Susan Anderson-Newham, 2013 Mover & Shaker, block-play advocate, actor, writer, storyteller and, most importantly, the Pierce County Library System’s (WA) early learning supervising librarian. In this interview, Anderson-Newman talks about the importance of collaboration and a good sense of humor, why hands-on play is key to kids’ learning, her inspirations and passions, and her top picture books of all time.

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Books are the quietest and most constant of friends

Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers.

~Charles W. Eli

Books